[WSF-Discuss] Fwd: [GreenLeft_discussion] Stalin Archive now on theRevolutionary Democracy website

Sukla Sen sukla.sen at gmail.com
Mon Apr 19 05:31:04 CDT 2010


Quite a thoughtful comment deserving closer attention.

The concluding part, however, appears to be compelling:
*In any case the results were eventually due to overwhelming industrial,
material and technical wealth and power rather than tactics and strategy;
mostly a litany of errors, mistakes, miscalculations, surprise reversals and
luck.*

Sukla

On 19 April 2010 14:05, alan <alanmurphy at absamail.co.za> wrote:

>  “Apart from the bravery of the Red Army the vast, virtually endless,
> frozen stretches to be covered by the German ground forces, proved to be its
> undoing.”
>
>
>
> If it is the purpose here to uncover the propaganda myths of Stalin’s
> defeat of Hitler, then I think it is necessary to consider that it was
> likely that Japan’s reluctance to engage the USSR (instead of attacking
> Pearl Harbour) was pivotal to the axis failure; otherwise the Soviet’s
> Siberian troops would not have been able to fall back in defence. Also
> important was Hitler’s opening of too many fronts; he very probably would
> have taken Leningrad, Moscow and Stalingrad (perhaps even without Japan’s
> assistance) if he had focussed in that order, as he was advised/requested.
> This can be ascertained from wikipedia and other links. This could have
> resulted in the Nazi capture of oil fields sufficient to have withstood the
> allies, and today we might be speaking German and considering why the USA
> had formed a pact with the most fanatical dictator in history, Churchill.
>
>
>
> Another scenario is the backfiring of the allied support for Stalin
> (obviously not considered as a real threat to capitalism) and the Soviet
> capture of Europe, Japan and China. In which case we could be now speaking
> Russian and considering how working class Britain had mistakenly supported
> the world’s most evil tyrant, Roosevelt.
>
>
>
> It seems our perspective is possibly immensely ‘distorted’ by both the
> actual events of history and its portrayal, especially through mass media
> and propaganda. So why describe Stalin’s pact with Hitler as anything other
> than natural and expected? Didn’t communism, fascism, Nazism share the
> ideologies of opposing liberalism and capitalism? This ironically didn’t
> exist much during WW2, when all sides had command economies with full
> employment in a singular military endeavour. Or at least they were all
> variant forms of the same State Capitalism.
>
>
>
> I recently re-watched the World at War series and was surprised at some
> pro-soviet statements I had previously taken for granted. I am now thinking
> that there were no ‘good’ sides, and history would have just unfolded *
> differently* if others had been victors – with huge human costs no matter
> the outcome - we are instead expected to believe that the particular
> conclusion was of invaluable significance. In any case the results were
> eventually due to overwhelming industrial, material and technical wealth and
> power rather than tactics and strategy; mostly a litany of errors, mistakes,
> miscalculations, surprise reversals and luck.
>
>
>
> Alan
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>
> *From:* worldsocialforum-discuss-bounces at openspaceforum.net [mailto:
> worldsocialforum-discuss-bounces at openspaceforum.net] *On Behalf Of *Sukla
> Sen
> *Sent:* 19 April 2010 05:31 AM
> *To:* IHRO; issueonline; arkitectindia at yahoogroups.com; indiathinkersnet;
> invitesplus at yahoogroups.com; national-forum-of-india at yahoogroups.co.in;
> Post WSFDiscuss; bahujan; international-peace-festival
> *Subject:* [WSF-Discuss] Fwd: [GreenLeft_discussion] Stalin Archive now on
> theRevolutionary Democracy website
>
>
>
> Quote
>
> Stalin was a leading communist revolutionary of the twentieth century whose
> seminal contribution is increasingly felt in the twenty first century. His
> name is identified with the construction of socialism in the Soviet Union,
> the victory over fascism in the Second World War and the transition to
> communist society.
>
> Unquote
>
>
>
> The (pretty much unsubstantiated) claim that Stalin's "seminal contribution
> is increasingly felt in the twenty first century" is so very much out of
> touch with actual reality and in fact utterly funny that it hardly merits
> any comment.
>
> The politics of 'Socialism in One Country' as initiated and championed by
> Stalin, along with a few other related issues, has been discussed by this
> commentator in some details under the same caption back in 1989 (available
> at <http://www.jstor.org/pss/4394571> and <
> http://archive.epw.in/data/PDF/001620_EPW_25_3_1989_Vol_XXIV_No_12/DISCUSSION_Socialism%20in%20One%20Country.pdf>,
> for both subscriptions are required). One may also look up <
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialism_in_One_Country> for a brief but
> useful treatment.
>
>
>
> The claim as regards the "the transition to communist society" is also
> obviously as silly.
>
>
>
> Here, we'd in brief, comment only on an aspect of "the victory over fascism
> in the Second World War" supposedly engineered and spearheaded by Stalin.
>
> In fact, after the pitiable implosion of the Soviet State preceded by
> public repudiation of Stalin's legacy by the successor regime soon after the
> death of the dictator without causing any waves of protest or whatever in
> its immediate aftermath, despite "the transition to communist society" led
> by Stalin and all that crap, his only claim to "greatness" lies in his
> presumed role in the "the victory over fascism in the Second World War".
>
>
>
> Soviet Russia under Stalin, it needs be emphasised here, had joined the WW
> II virtually as a junior accomplice of the Hitlerite Nazi Germany via the
> Treaty of Non-Aggression between Germany and the Soviet Union signed on
> 23/24 August 1939. This is popularly known as Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact.
>
> (Ref. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molotov–Ribbentrop_Pact>.)
>
> The start of the war is generally held to be 1 September 1939 beginning
> with the German invasion of Poland coming barely a week after the signing of
> the Treaty. (Ref. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II>.) Evidently,
> it was not a mere coincidence. The Treaty played a decisive role in
> triggering off German attack on Poland.
>
> The momentum had started visibly building up since 1933 with Hitler
> occupying power in Germany.
>
>
>
> "In addition to stipulations of non-aggression, the treaty included a
> secret protocol dividing Northern and Eastern Europe into German and Soviet
> spheres of influence, anticipating potential "territorial and political
> rearrangements" of these countries. Thereafter, Germany and the Soviet Union
> invaded their respective sides of Poland, dividing the country between them.
> Part of eastern Finland was annexed by the Soviet Union after the Winter
> War. This was followed by Soviet annexations of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania
> and Bessarabia."
>
> [Source: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molotov–Ribbentrop_Pact>.]
>
>
>
> Also relevant:
>
> Quote
>
> On September 15, 1939, Stalin concluded a durable ceasefire with Japan, to
> take effect the following day (it would be upgraded to a formal armistice in
> April 1941).[20] The day after that, September 17, he belatedly joined
> Germany in the joint invasion of Poland. Although some fighting continued
> until October 5, the two invading armies held at least one joint victory
> parade on September 25, and reinforced their partnership with aGerman–Soviet
> Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Demarcation on September 28.
>
> On November 30, the Soviet Union attacked Finland, for which it was
> expelled from the League of Nations. The following year, the USSR annexed
> the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, together with parts of
> Romania.
>
> Unquote
>
> [See: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allies_of_World_War_II#Soviet_Union>.]
>
> That's about Stalin's opposition, nay fight, against fascism.
>
> Even if we forget the disastrous impact of the "social fascism" line
> pursued by the Comintern under Stalin, and thereby the German Communist
> Party, in Germany itself.
>
>
>
> Here is an interesting snippet going back to 1934 allowing a revealing
> glimpse into Stalin's mind and his attitude towards fascism:
>
> Quote
>
> In this connection some German politicians say that the U.S.S.R. has now
> taken an orientation towards France and Poland; that from an opponent of the
> Versailles Treaty it has become a supporter of it, and that this change is
> to be explained by the establishment of the fascist regime in Germany. That
> is not true. Of course, we are far from being enthusiastic about the fascist
> regime in Germany. But it is not a question of fascism here, if only for the
> reason that fascism in Italy, for example, has not prevented the U.S.S.R.
> from establishing the best relations with that country. .... We never had
> any orientation towards Germany, nor have we any orientation towards Poland
> and France. Our orientation in the past and our orientation at the present
> time is towards the U.S.S.R., and towards the U.S.S.R. alone. (Stormy
> applause.) And if the interests of the U.S.S.R. demand rapprochement with
> one country or another which is not interested in disturbing peace, we adopt
> this course without hesitation.
>
> Unquote
>
> [See: p. 691/2 at <http://ciml.250x.com/archive/stalin/est1934_1.html>.]
>
>
>
> It is Hitler, and NOT Stalin, who broke with the USSR. Stalin, at no stage,
> took any initiative to break with the Nazi Germany and its ongoing war of
> aggression.
>
> "On 22 June 1941, Germany, along with other European Axis members and
> Finland, [in an apparently surprise, and which would turn out to be fatally
> premature, move] invaded the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa."
>
> [Ref: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II>.]
>
> In the initial phases, the USSR suffered enormous losses.
>
> But eventually the success turned out to be Pyrrhic for the Germans.
>
> Apart from the bravery of the Red Army the vast, virtually endless, frozen
> stretches to be covered by the German ground forces, proved to be its
> undoing. Almost reenacting Napoleon's devastating defeat in Tsarist Russia
> about a century and three decades back.
>
>
>
>  The Soviet Russia joined the "imperialist" Allies.
>
> As a price the Comintern had to be dissolved.
>
> Quote
>
> At the start of World War II, the Comintern supported a policy of
> non-intervention, arguing that the war was an imperialist war between
> various national ruling classes, much like World War Ihad been (see
> Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact). But when the Soviet Union itself was invaded on 22
> June 1941, the Comintern changed its position to one of active support for
> the Allies.
>
> On May 15, 1943, a declaration of the Executive Committee was sent out to
> all sections of the International, calling for the dissolution of Comintern.
> The declaration read:
>
> "The historical role of the Communist International, organised in 1919 as a
> result of the political collapse of the overwhelming majority of the old
> pre-war workers' parties, consisted in that it preserved the teachings of
> Marxism from vulgarisation and distortion by opportunist elements of the
> labor movement.... But long before the war it became increasingly clear
> that, to the extent that the internal as well as the international situation
> of individual countries became more complicated, the solution of the
> problems of the labor movement of each individual country through the medium
> of some international centre would meet with insuperable obstacles."
>
>
>
> Concretely, the declaration asked the member sections to approve:
>
> "To dissolve the Communist International as a guiding centre of the
> international labor movement, releasing sections of the Communist
> International from the obligations ensuing from the constitution and
> decisions of the Congresses of the Communist International."
>
>
>
> After endorsements of the declaration were received from the member
> sections, the International was dissolved... (On June 1943, the Comintern
> itself was dissolved).
>
> Usually, it is asserted that the dissolution came about as Stalin wished to
> calm his World War II Allies (particularly Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston
> Churchill) and keep them from suspecting the Soviet Union of pursuing a
> policy of trying to foment revolution in other countries
>
> Unquote
>
> {See: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comintern>.]
>
>
>
> That's about Stalin's anti-fascism and anti-imperialism.
>
>
>
> Sukla
>
>
>
>
>
> On 19 April 2010 00:17, Marxist Front <marxistfront at yahoo.co.in> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> The Revolutionary Democracy website at: www.revolutionarydemocracy.org
> now includes a Stalin Archive.
>
> Just Scroll down the left side of the site.
>
> The archive includes so far Volumes 14 to 18 of the Works of Stalin
> which were published by Red Star Press, London, in the 1970s and 1980s;
> the Correspondence Between the Chairman of the Council of Ministers of
> the USSR and the Presidents of the USA and the Prime Ministers of Great
> Britain During the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 and the Minutes of
> The Tehran Yalta& Potsdam Conferences.
>
> Here is the introductory note to the archive:
>
> Stalin was a leading communist revolutionary of the twentieth century
> whose seminal contribution is increasingly felt in the twenty first
> century. His name is identified with the construction of socialism in
> the Soviet Union, the victory over fascism in the Second World War and
> the transition to communist society. These colossal victories would not
> have been possible without the defeat of the oppositions led by Trotsky
> and Bukharin who opposed socialist industrialisation and
> collectivisation. By the time of the death of Stalin a large people’s
> democratic camp had been built up in central and eastern Europe and Asia
> alongside the USSR.
>
> Yet the writings of Stalin are not easy to locate despite the fact that
> a number of websites include some of his works. 13 Volumes of the Works
> were completed in English prior to the Twentieth Congress of the CPSU in
> 1956. The dummy of Volume 14 had been printed prior to this event and
> the publication of the volume was announced before the Closed Speech. It
> was not to be printed. The Soviet archives show that preparatory work
> had also begun for volumes 15-17 of the Works of Stalin. This archive
> represents an attempt to widen the availability of the writings of this
> classic of Marxism. We begin by reconstituting Volumes 14 to 18 of the
> Works of Stalin which were published by Red Star Press, London in the
> 1970s and 1980s. These volumes which are much in demand have been out of
> print for many years. The Red Star Press compilation drew upon the
> labours of communists who had gathered materials for the publication of
> the Works of Stalin in French and German. Separate from these endeavours
> communists in Albania and Spain independently compiled volumes 14 in
> their languages. In the United States, Volumes 14 to 16 were published
> in Russian from Stanford based upon the official Soviet publications.
>
> Under Khrushchev and Brezhnev some of the contributions of Stalin
> bearing upon diplomatic matters were published in the Soviet Union. We
> are placing a part of these on the web. After the fall of the USSR
> volumes 14 to 18 have been published in Russian and more are under
> preparation under the editorship of Prof. Richard Kosalapov. With the
> opening up of the Stalin Archive currently held in the former Central
> Party Archive of the CPSU a considerable part of the vast body of
> Stalin’s writings are now available in the public domain. In the near
> future we plan to put on the web in a chronological form some of
> Stalin’s writings which are not included in existing collections. This
> is an international task and we appeal for assistance on this in terms
> of the location of materials and the translation of Stalin’s writings
> from the Russian. Those who wish to help in this cause may contact us
> at: editor_revdem at rediffmail.com <editor_revdem%40rediffmail.com> <mailto:
> editor_revdem%40rediffmail.com <editor_revdem%2540rediffmail.com>>
>
>
>
> --
> Peace Is Doable
>



-- 
Peace Is Doable
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